Environmental Biology

The courses below are offered through the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology.

Department Chair: Shahid Naeem, 1017 Schermerhorn Extension
212-854-4499
sn2121@columbia.edu

Departmental Adviser: Matthew Palmer, 3 Claremont
212-851-1883

Departmental Offices: 10th floor, Schermerhorn Extension
212-854-9987

Web: www.columbia.edu/cu/e3b

Fall 2014

Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology

Advanced Graduate Classes

  • EEEB V1010x. Human Origins & Evolution. 3 pts.

    Lab fee: $25. This is an introductory course in human evolution. Building on a foundation of evolutionary theory, students explore primate behavioral morphology and then trace the last 65 million years of primate evolution from the earliest Paleocene forms to the fossil remains of earliest humans and human relatives. Along with Behavioral Biology of the Living Primates this serves as a core required class for the EBHS program. [Taught every fall.] Recitation Section Required.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Fall 2014 :: EEEB V1010 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    1010
    67980
    001
    MW 11:40a - 12:55p
    602 HAMILTON HALL
    J. Shapiro 45 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W2001x. Environmental Biology I: Elements to Organisms. 3 pts.

    Introductory biology course for majors in biology or environmental biology, emphasizing the ecological and evolutionary context of modern biology.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Fall 2014 :: EEEB W2001 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    2001
    17402
    001
    TuTh 1:10p - 2:25p
    TBA
    D. Rubenstein
    S. Naeem
    43 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W3220x. The Evolution of Human Growth and Development. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: EEEB V1010 or ANTH V1007 or Instructor permission.

    This course explores central issues in human growth and development from birth through senescence. Emphasis will be placed on the factors responsible for the variability in current human growth patterns as well as the evolutionary divergence of a uniquely human pattern from our closest living and fossil relatives. [Taught intermittently.]

  • EEEB W4060x. Invasion Biology. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: A course in Environmental Biology or instructor's permission

    This course examines the spread of non-indigenous species to habitats and areas outside their home range, and the effects, both negative and positive, that establishment of new species may have in different environments. Using lectures, class discussions and student presentations, we will examine the processes and major vectors that can lead to the introduction of non-indigenous species, the interaction between species' and habitat characteristics in determining the success of a potential invader, and the political and economic consequences of invasive species management actions. Two proposed day trips will also expose students to some practical methods that aim to limit the introduction and spread of potentially damaging invasive species in local terrestrial and marine environments.

  • Please note: occasional field trips on Fridays and Saturdays are required for this course

    EEEB W4110y. Coastal and Estuarine Ecology. 4 pts.

    Prerequisites: Environmental Biology I or equivalent

    Environments close to shore are hugely ecologically important, not least in terms of their contributions to biodiversity, primary and secondary productivity. Coastal and Estuarine Ecology introduces students to a range of nearshore habitats and biota, the processes that operate in these environments, and potential threats through, for example, habitat destruction and alteration, overfishing, and climate change. Field research makes up a large component of the course and its assessment, with students given the opportunity to build proficiency in field observation and enquiry through either several short field trips or a week-long trip to a dedicated marine station. The specific structure of the trip(s) will be determined during the fall, with more details and regular updates listed on the Courseworks site.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Fall 2014 :: EEEB W4110 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4110
    63586
    001
    TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
    TBA
    J. Drew 16 / 15 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W4111x. Ecosystem Ecology and Global Change. 3 pts.

    This course will provide an introduction to ecosystem ecology. Topics include primary production carbon storage, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem feedbacks to climate change. By the end of the course, students will be well versed in the basics of ecosystem ecology and have exposure to some current areas of research. Topics covered will include some aspects that are well established and others that are hotly debated among scientists. Throughout the course, students will be encouraged to think independently and act like research scientists.Discussion Section Required.

  • EEEB W4112x. Ichthyology. 3 pts.

    Fish are an incredibly diverse group with upwards of 27,000 named species. They are important ecologically, represent one of the major vertebrate lineages and face numerous conservation threats. This course will provide students with the tools to understand how the evolution, systematics, anatomy, and diversity of fishes influence their conservation status.

  • EEEB W4122x. Fundamentals of Ecology and Evolution. 4 pts.

    Prerequisites: EEEB W2001 and W2002 or equivalent or permission of instructor

    An advanced survey of the basic concepts and theories of ecology and evolution, with particular emphasis on topics relevant to conservation biology. By the end of the course students will have (1) gained a thorough knowledge of the intellectual history and intersections of these two disciplines, (2) forged some clear links between conservation, ecology, and evolution, and (3) gained quantitative confidence in the use of some basic models in ecology and evolution.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Fall 2014 :: EEEB W4122 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4122
    12541
    001
    MW 9:00a - 10:50a
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    D. Menge
    J. Cracraft
    4 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB G6150x and y. Advances in Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology. 3 pts.

    Survey of recent advances in the ecological, evolutionary, and environmental sciences. Enrollment limited to 20.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Fall 2014 :: EEEB G6150 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    6150
    61549
    001
    M 11:00a - 12:50p
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    D. Menge
    K. Griffin
    S. Naeem
    4 [ More Info ]

    Spring 2014

    Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology

    Advanced Graduate Classes

  • EEEB W3087y. Conservation Biology. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: Introductory organismal biology course, ideally EEEB 2002.

    Applications of biological principles to the conservation of biodiverstiy. Because conservation biology is a cross-disciplinary field, some of the social, philosophical, and economic dimensions of biological conservation are also addressed. Recitation Section Required.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Spring 2014 :: EEEB W3087 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    3087
    68378
    001
    M 4:10p - 6:00p
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    S. Spector 11 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W4060x. Invasion Biology. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: A course in Environmental Biology or instructor's permission

    This course examines the spread of non-indigenous species to habitats and areas outside their home range, and the effects, both negative and positive, that establishment of new species may have in different environments. Using lectures, class discussions and student presentations, we will examine the processes and major vectors that can lead to the introduction of non-indigenous species, the interaction between species' and habitat characteristics in determining the success of a potential invader, and the political and economic consequences of invasive species management actions. Two proposed day trips will also expose students to some practical methods that aim to limit the introduction and spread of potentially damaging invasive species in local terrestrial and marine environments.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4060 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4060
    20958
    001
    TuTh 10:10a - 11:25a
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    E. Bone 5 [ More Info ]
  • Please note: occasional field trips on Fridays and Saturdays are required for this course

    EEEB W4110y. Coastal and Estuarine Ecology. 4 pts.

    Prerequisites: Environmental Biology I or equivalent

    Environments close to shore are hugely ecologically important, not least in terms of their contributions to biodiversity, primary and secondary productivity. Coastal and Estuarine Ecology introduces students to a range of nearshore habitats and biota, the processes that operate in these environments, and potential threats through, for example, habitat destruction and alteration, overfishing, and climate change. Field research makes up a large component of the course and its assessment, with students given the opportunity to build proficiency in field observation and enquiry through either several short field trips or a week-long trip to a dedicated marine station. The specific structure of the trip(s) will be determined during the fall, with more details and regular updates listed on the Courseworks site.

  • EEEB G4134y. Behavioral Ecology. 4 pts.

    Prerequisites: Graduate students: EEEB 6110 and permission of instructor
    Undergraduate students: PSYCH W2420 or BC BIOL 3280 and permission of instructor

    An examination of evolutionary and behavioral ecological theory. The course will focus on natural selection, kin selection, and sexual selection, as well as related topics including cooperation, conflict, cooperative breeding, signaling, sex allocation, reproductive skew, and alternative mating strategies among others. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the theoretical bases of these theories, as well as empirical tests of these concepts. The course is writing intensive and written assignments will encourage critical assessment of theory, experimental design, and data analysis.

  • EEEB G4180y. The Other Greenhouse Gases. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: Graduate standing in E3B or DEES or approval of instructor.

    Methane and nitrous oxide trap ~25 and ~300 times as much heat per molecule as carbon dioxide, and their atmospheric concentrations have risen sharply due to anthropogenic activity, yet they have received much less attention than carbon dioxide in the popular press as well as the scientific literature. In this seminar course we will learn about the current state of ecological knowledge and explore cutting-edge ecological questions surrounding these fascinating gases. By the end of the course, students will have a current understanding of the ecology and biogeochemistry of methane and nitrous oxide, and will hopefully have some ideas about where the field should head.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Spring 2014 :: EEEB G4180 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4180
    18548
    001
    M 9:00a - 10:50a
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    D. Menge 3 / 15 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W4192y. Introduction to Landscape Analysis. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: SDEV W3390 or EESC W4050 or permission of instructor

    This class provides basic theory in landscape analysis and training in methods for analyzing landscapes, focusing on interpretation of satellite images. The class covers approaches and definitions in landscape analysis, data sources, land cover classification, change detection, accuracy assessment, projections of future land cover change, and techniques to interpret results of these analyses. Students will obtain hands-on experience working with data from a landscape related to his/her research or a landscape chosen by the instructors.Lab Required.

  • EEEB W4195. Marine Conservation Ecology. 3 pts.

    Prerequisites: EEEB G6110, EEEB G6112, or EEEB G6990, basic statistics, or permission of instructor

    This course provides an overview of marine ecology, introducing processes and systems from which the marine environment is formed and the issues and challenges which surround its future conservation. The course includes a spring break trip that is a requirement. There is a course fee of $1800 to cover expenses incurred on the trip. While in Belize, students will spend 1.5 hours every day in the water and thus, need to be able to swim and practice appropriate water safety. Final enrollment in the course will be determined by a water safety test conducted within the first two weeks of classes. Course offered during spring 2014 without the Belize field trip component.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4195 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4195
    84699
    001
    M 2:10p - 4:00p
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    J. Drew 13 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W4240y. Animal Migration in Theory and Practice. 3 pts. enrollment limit 25, field trips will be scheduled

    This course presents an overview of migration, from the selective pressures animals face in migrating to the mechanisms of navigation and orientation. We will explore migration in a variety of animal taxa. Bird migration will be studied in-depth, as birds exhibit some of the most spectacular long distance migrations and are the most well-studied of animal migrators. The challenges of global climate change and changing land use patterns, and how species are coping with them, will also be explored.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Spring 2014 :: EEEB W4240 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4240
    65847
    001
    W 6:10p - 8:00p
    652 SCHERMERHORN HALL
    S. Elbin 11 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB G4260y. Food, Ecology, and Globalization. 3 pts. enrollment limited to 30 students

    Prerequisites: Instructor's permission

    This class examines the social, ecological, and political economic roles of what and how we eat from a global perspective.

    Course
    Number
    Call Number/
    Section
    Days & Times/
    Location
    Instructor Enrollment
    Spring 2014 :: EEEB G4260 :: Credit Sections
    EEEB
    4260
    18583
    001
    Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
    1015 EXT SCHERMERHORN HALL
    E. Sterling
    S. Akabas
    34 / 40 [ More Info ]
  • EEEB W4655y. Biodiversity, Natural Resources and Conflict. 3 pts.

    Environmental programs worldwide are fraught with disputes between groups of people over natural resources. Such conflict can be highly complex, may undermine or deter environmental conservation efforts, and may even foster violence. These conflicts often involve disagreements between different human parties that are divided by culture, social values, and perceptions about the ethics and appropriatemess of how resources should be allocated or used. Combining specific case studies, ecological and social theory, and a complex systems approach, this course will enhance the proficiency of participants to understand, study, and manage natural resource-based conflicts. The course is designed for conservation scientists, environmental policymakers, rural development specialists, political ecologists, and conflict/peace workers.

  • EEEB G6150x and y. Advances in Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology. 3 pts.

    Survey of recent advances in the ecological, evolutionary, and environmental sciences. Enrollment limited to 20.

  • The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction or to change the instructors as may become necessary.